Glimpses
Betye Saar. Black Girl’s Window, 1969. Assemblage in window. 35 ¾ x 18 x 1 ½ in. (90.8 x 45.7 x 3.8 cm). Collection of the artist; Courtesy of Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, LLC, New York.
now-dig-this
David Hammons. America the Beautiful, 1968. Lithograph and body print. 39 x 29 1⁄2 in. (99.1 x 74.9 cm). Oakland Museum, Oakland Museum Founders Fund.
now-dig-this_2_0
Dale Brockman Davis. Swept, 1970. Mixed media. 30 x 40 x 6 in. (76.2 x 101.6 x 15.2 cm). Blocker Collection c/o Rick Blocker.
now-dig-this_3
David Hammons. Bag Lady in Flight, c. 1970. Shopping bags, grease, and hair. 42 1/2 x 116 1/2 x 3 1/2 in. (108 x 295.9 x 8.9 cm). Collection of Eileen Harris Norton, Santa Monica, California.
now-dig-this_4
John Outterbridge. No Time for Jivin’, from the Containment Series, 1969. Mixed media. 56 x 60 in. (142.2 x 152.4 cm). Mills College Art Museum Collection. Purchased with funds from the Susan L Mills Fund.
now-dig-this_5
Noah Purifoy. Untitled (Assemblage), 1967. Mixed media. 66 x 39 x 8 in. (167.6 x 99.1 x 20.3 cm). Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Museum Purchase, the William A. Clark Fund and Gift of Dr. Samella Lewis. 1993.3. © Courtesy the Noah Purifoy Foundation.
Corcoran Gallery of ArtPurifry1993.3
Suzanne Jackson. Apparitional Visitations, 1973. Acrylic wash on canvas. 54 x 72 in. (137.2 x 182.9 cm). Collection of Vaughn C. Payne Jr., M.D.
now-dig-this_7
Charles White. Love Letter #1, 1971. Lithograph with documents. 22 3/16 x 30 in. (56.4 x 76.2 cm). Private Collection.
now-dig-this_8
John Riddle. Ghetto Merchant, 1966. Mixed media. 41 x 18 1⁄4 in. (104.1 x 46.4 cm). Courtesy of Claude and Ann Booker, Los Angeles.
now-dig-this_9
NextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnailNextGen ScrollGallery thumbnail

Now Dig This!

Work From L.A.’s Groundbreaking 1960s and 1970s African-American Art Scene

Inspired by the civil rights and black power movements, drawn to L.A. by economic opportunity, and nourished by a thriving Southern California arts scene, African-American artists formed a historic cultural community in the city in the 1960s and 1970s. They would influence not just one another but also the course of 20th century art in the region and the nation. As the exhibition Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980 goes into its final weekend at the Hammer Museum, we present a selection of work–sculpture, painting, mixed-media projects–from a group of pioneering artists including Betye Saar, John Outterbridge, and David Hammons. Get a taste here, then catch Now Dig This!–which the Los Angeles Times named one of the 10 best museum shows of the year–while you still can.

Now Dig This! Art and Black Los Angeles, 1960-1980. Installation view at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles. October 2, 2011-January 8, 2012. Photography by Robert Wedemeyer.