CONNECTING PEOPLE TO IDEAS AND TO EACH OTHER
CONNECTING PEOPLE TO IDEAS AND TO EACH OTHER
In the Green Room

UCLA Education Dean Marcelo Suárez-Orozco

Training for the L.A. Traffic

In 2012, Marcelo Suárez-Orozco became dean of the UCLA Graduate School of Education; previously, he was a professor of education at New York and Harvard universities. Before participating in a panel on what immigration reform might mean for Los Angeles, he talked about his Type A personality, his empty refrigerator door, and his love of empanadas in the Zócalo green room.

Q:
What would you order for your last meal?

A:
Empanadas.

Q:
What’s your favorite spot in Los Angeles?

A:
There is a little Korean joint off Wilshire in Koreatown that is fabulous. [That could be any number of joints.] I can’t remember—Wilshire at Mariposa, maybe? Around there?

Q:
What teacher or professor changed your life, if any?

A:
George De Vos at UC Berkeley. He fundamentally altered how I think about education in our country. And Howard Gardner is the second scholar who changed my life, my colleague at Harvard for many years.

Q:
Did you have any nicknames as a kid?

A:
Sapo.

Q:
What’s hanging on your refrigerator?

A:
Nothing. It’s a brand-new refrigerator, and on the new refrigerators the magnets don’t work, so I’m searching for a way to put something on it.

Q:
What’s your biggest weakness?

A:
Gluttony.

Q:
How do you pass the time when you’re stuck in traffic?

A:
Oy vey! Where to start? I’m a Type A, I’m used to the A/C [train] from Brooklyn to the Village, so this is taking immense training.

Q:
How do you procrastinate?

A:
I don’t have time to procrastinate.

Q:
What word or phrase do you use most often?

A:
“It’s complicated.”