Art of the American Kitchen

Anisa Makhoul trained as a printmaker at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and turned to illustration after living in Amsterdam, where she bought her first set of gouache paints. Now based in Portland, Oregon, her work has appeared everywhere from Vogue to Harrods of London. Her illustrations for Zócalo draw our attention to the beautiful clash of shapes, colors, and textures of the American kitchen. Her style pairs loose, almost journalistic line art sketches with bold forms in bright colors—sometimes in juxtaposition, sometimes combined into single paintings. The effect is simultaneously …

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