Zócalo Public SquareEvents – Zócalo Public Square http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org Ideas Journalism With a Head and a Heart Fri, 17 Nov 2017 11:00:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 Is L.A. Really Part of Latin America?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/is-la-really-part-latin-america/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/is-la-really-part-latin-america/#respond Tue, 14 Nov 2017 08:14:05 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=89372 The “Mexicanism” of Los Angeles, wrote Mexican poet and onetime L.A. resident Octavio Paz, “floats, never quite existing, never quite vanishing …. I say ‘floats’ because it never mixes or unites with the other world, the North American world based on precision and efficiency.” L.A.’s historical connections to Mexico and the rest of Latin America are well known, and its human connections—in a city of immigrants and their progeny—are obvious. Mexicans and Central Americans in particular have shaped Angeleno identity for generations. But how Latin American is L.A. really? The city’s modern roots are Midwestern, it has U.S.-style segregation, its culture is dominated by Hollywood, and it has little of the pan-American feel of Miami, which includes a large population of Cubans and Central and South Americans. Nor do transnational Mexican entertainers, third-generation Mexican Americans, and recent Salvadoran immigrants all engage with Latin America in the same way. On some

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The “Mexicanism” of Los Angeles, wrote Mexican poet and onetime L.A. resident Octavio Paz, “floats, never quite existing, never quite vanishing …. I say ‘floats’ because it never mixes or unites with the other world, the North American world based on precision and efficiency.” L.A.’s historical connections to Mexico and the rest of Latin America are well known, and its human connections—in a city of immigrants and their progeny—are obvious. Mexicans and Central Americans in particular have shaped Angeleno identity for generations. But how Latin American is L.A. really? The city’s modern roots are Midwestern, it has U.S.-style segregation, its culture is dominated by Hollywood, and it has little of the pan-American feel of Miami, which includes a large population of Cubans and Central and South Americans. Nor do transnational Mexican entertainers, third-generation Mexican Americans, and recent Salvadoran immigrants all engage with Latin America in the same way. On some level, isn’t L.A.’s large Latino population here partly because so many people sought refuge from the problems of Latin America? Did today’s L.A. grow up in opposition to Latin America—by erasing so much of its Spanish-Mexican past? And why do L.A. business elites prefer to emphasize their connections to Asia, and our status as a “Pacific Rim” city? Comedian and art collector Cheech Marin, Univision anchor León Krauze, and The New York Times national correspondent Jennifer Medina visit Zócalo to examine the bridges and walls between Los Angeles and the world to its south.

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How Can We Reverse the Depression Epidemic?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/can-reverse-depression-epidemic/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/can-reverse-depression-epidemic/#respond Thu, 09 Nov 2017 23:45:45 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=89315 Depression is the world’s greatest health problem and leading source of human misery. One in four women and one in six men suffer from depression, which has a devastating economic impact since those afflicted often can’t work. Depression is also the strongest risk factor for the world’s 1 million annual suicides—a total that outnumbers deaths from war, natural disasters, and murder. And while new research is identifying the various biological, cognitive, and environmental factors associated with depression and thus offering the promise of progress, the prevalence of the disease grows and it remains hard to treat. What explains this depression health crisis? Why don’t more people obtain treatment? Why doesn’t treatment work for 50 percent of those with depression? And what can be done socially, clinically, and through research to reduce depression and improve the lives of hundreds of millions of people? UCLA Chancellor Gene Block, National Alliance on Mental

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Depression is the world’s greatest health problem and leading source of human misery. One in four women and one in six men suffer from depression, which has a devastating economic impact since those afflicted often can’t work. Depression is also the strongest risk factor for the world’s 1 million annual suicides—a total that outnumbers deaths from war, natural disasters, and murder. And while new research is identifying the various biological, cognitive, and environmental factors associated with depression and thus offering the promise of progress, the prevalence of the disease grows and it remains hard to treat. What explains this depression health crisis? Why don’t more people obtain treatment? Why doesn’t treatment work for 50 percent of those with depression? And what can be done socially, clinically, and through research to reduce depression and improve the lives of hundreds of millions of people? UCLA Chancellor Gene Block, National Alliance on Mental Illness policy director Darcy Gruttadaro, UCLA behavioral geneticist Jonathan Flint, and psychiatrist and chief medical officer at Blue Cross of Idaho Rhonda Robinson Beale visit Zócalo to examine the measures it would take to cure the world’s depression epidemic.

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How Did Barack Obama Create Himself?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/barack-obama-create/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/barack-obama-create/#respond Mon, 30 Oct 2017 19:42:40 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=89118 Barack Obama was president of the United States for eight years, and the broad outlines of his story—his Hawaiian birth, his fatherless childhood, his education at elite institutions, his work as a community organizer and politician in Chicago—are now familiar elements of American history. But even today, Obama retains a remarkable mystique, and can seem unknowable. All leaders must create narratives around themselves, but Obama’s is especially dense and complicated. Who is Barack Obama? How did he construct his own identity—and what did that construction mean for the way he governed America? And in the end, did Obama miss opportunities to build a more durable legacy—particularly around race as well as politics—because of the limits of the narrative he created for himself? David J. Garrow, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama, sits down with Warren Olney at Zócalo to unpack the peculiar origin

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Barack Obama was president of the United States for eight years, and the broad outlines of his story—his Hawaiian birth, his fatherless childhood, his education at elite institutions, his work as a community organizer and politician in Chicago—are now familiar elements of American history. But even today, Obama retains a remarkable mystique, and can seem unknowable. All leaders must create narratives around themselves, but Obama’s is especially dense and complicated. Who is Barack Obama? How did he construct his own identity—and what did that construction mean for the way he governed America? And in the end, did Obama miss opportunities to build a more durable legacy—particularly around race as well as politics—because of the limits of the narrative he created for himself? David J. Garrow, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Rising Star: The Making of Barack Obama, sits down with Warren Olney at Zócalo to unpack the peculiar origin story of the American president.

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If We Love Hawaii So Much, Why Don’t We Vote?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/love-hawaii-much-dont-vote/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/love-hawaii-much-dont-vote/#respond Fri, 29 Sep 2017 09:00:55 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=88236 By many measures of personal happiness, job satisfaction, and pride in their communities and their state, Hawaii residents rank near the top among all Americans. Yet this doesn’t translate into high levels of civic engagement, particularly as measured by voter turnout. Social science holds that the more fulfilled and connected people are, the more politically and civically active they’ll be, but Hawaii bucks this prediction. It consistently sits near the bottom in participation in national elections—despite having placed a native son in the White House—and it was dead last in voter participation rate for the 2016 presidential contest. Some blame Hawaii’s low participation on the reluctance to embrace mail-only voting. But does the state’s lack of competitive races also dissuade voters from showing up? Do other indices of engagement—a 2016 Forbes magazine story ranked Hawaii 37th out of 50 states in charitable giving, and 48th in volunteering and service—indicate that 

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By many measures of personal happiness, job satisfaction, and pride in their communities and their state, Hawaii residents rank near the top among all Americans. Yet this doesn’t translate into high levels of civic engagement, particularly as measured by voter turnout. Social science holds that the more fulfilled and connected people are, the more politically and civically active they’ll be, but Hawaii bucks this prediction. It consistently sits near the bottom in participation in national elections—despite having placed a native son in the White House—and it was dead last in voter participation rate for the 2016 presidential contest. Some blame Hawaii’s low participation on the reluctance to embrace mail-only voting. But does the state’s lack of competitive races also dissuade voters from showing up? Do other indices of engagement—a 2016 Forbes magazine story ranked Hawaii 37th out of 50 states in charitable giving, and 48th in volunteering and service—indicate that Hawaii residents are disconnected not only from politics, but from civic life in general? Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy Pete Peterson, director of the Hawaii Government Employees Association Randy Perreira, and Barbara Ankersmit, president of research at marketing and communications firm Anthology, visit Zócalo to examine why Hawaii voters go adrift from elections—and what can be done to turn it around.

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Is China Prepared to Lead the Global Economy?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/china-prepared-lead-global-economy/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/china-prepared-lead-global-economy/#respond Wed, 27 Sep 2017 19:13:00 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=88211 As America retreats from global leadership—blowing up trade agreements, questioning longstanding security alliances, dropping out of the Paris climate accord—China is stepping into the void. In purchasing-power terms, the Chinese economy already is larger than its U.S. counterpart. And Xi Jinping’s regime is building China-led global institutions, expanding his nation’s infrastructure investments deep into the developing world, and defending trade agreements and globalization in the face of Trumpian protectionism. Yet for all its advances, China remains a developing country itself, with one of the world’s most repressive governments. Is China rich enough to be the global economic top dog? Is it trusted enough to lead Asian markets that have been unnerved by recent Chinese military adventurism in the Himalayas and the South China Sea? And does China possess sufficient rule of law and the institutional accountability to command the respect of the international financial order? UCLA Anderson economist Jerry Nickelsburg,

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As America retreats from global leadership—blowing up trade agreements, questioning longstanding security alliances, dropping out of the Paris climate accord—China is stepping into the void. In purchasing-power terms, the Chinese economy already is larger than its U.S. counterpart. And Xi Jinping’s regime is building China-led global institutions, expanding his nation’s infrastructure investments deep into the developing world, and defending trade agreements and globalization in the face of Trumpian protectionism. Yet for all its advances, China remains a developing country itself, with one of the world’s most repressive governments. Is China rich enough to be the global economic top dog? Is it trusted enough to lead Asian markets that have been unnerved by recent Chinese military adventurism in the Himalayas and the South China Sea? And does China possess sufficient rule of law and the institutional accountability to command the respect of the international financial order? UCLA Anderson economist Jerry Nickelsburg, biotech executive Yiwen Li, UCLA Anderson business administration scholar Christopher S. Tang, and UC San Diego political economist Ruixue Jia visit Zócalo to examine when, if ever, China may assume global economic leadership.

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Is War with North Korea Inevitable?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/war-north-korea-inevitable/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/war-north-korea-inevitable/#respond Wed, 20 Sep 2017 09:33:11 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=88096 North Korea test-fires intercontinental missiles that may be able to reach the U.S. West Coast. Kim Jong-un threatens Guam, tangles with China, and conducts a nuclear test of what his country claims is a hydrogen bomb. And in America, a dysfunctional and internationally unpopular White House answers North Korean provocations with threats of “unprecedented fire and fury” and criticism of China as well as America’s South Korean allies. How close is the world to a calamity on the Korean peninsula? How are Koreans—both residents of the peninsula and members of the diaspora around the world—responding to the instability? And how prepared is the world for the possibilities of war and a resulting refugee crisis—or, at the other extreme, for an alternative scenario of reunification? UCLA Korea historian John Duncan, senior advisor at the nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation collaborative N Square Paul Carroll, cultural researcher at UCLA film school Suk-Young Kim,

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North Korea test-fires intercontinental missiles that may be able to reach the U.S. West Coast. Kim Jong-un threatens Guam, tangles with China, and conducts a nuclear test of what his country claims is a hydrogen bomb. And in America, a dysfunctional and internationally unpopular White House answers North Korean provocations with threats of “unprecedented fire and fury” and criticism of China as well as America’s South Korean allies. How close is the world to a calamity on the Korean peninsula? How are Koreans—both residents of the peninsula and members of the diaspora around the world—responding to the instability? And how prepared is the world for the possibilities of war and a resulting refugee crisis—or, at the other extreme, for an alternative scenario of reunification? UCLA Korea historian John Duncan, senior advisor at the nuclear disarmament and nonproliferation collaborative N Square Paul Carroll, cultural researcher at UCLA film school Suk-Young Kim, and CEO of Liberty in North Korea Hannah Song visit Zócalo to discuss the looming threat, and potential aftermath, of a renewed Korean war.

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What Does Treason Look Like?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/treason-look-like/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/treason-look-like/#respond Tue, 05 Sep 2017 18:38:37 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=87721 From Benedict Arnold’s defection to the McCarthy hearings to the Edward Snowden affair, the American public and the U.S. political system have wrestled with the meaning of treason—legally, morally, and politically. The Founding Fathers themselves were considered traitors by the British Crown, and the newly formed United States struggled with how to treat Americans who sided with King George III during the Revolution. Eighty years later, many Northerners condemned Southerners as traitors for breaking with the Union. In the 20th century, loyalty to ideologies over nation-states led to the cloak-and-dagger espionage of the Cold War. And in our own complex era of digital eavesdropping and online secret-sharing, definitions of treason have become still grayer and more elusive. What does it mean to contemporary Americans to betray one’s country? Who gets to decide and pass judgment on what constitutes treason—juries, politicians, the mass media, social networks? And have traditional ideas about

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From Benedict Arnold’s defection to the McCarthy hearings to the Edward Snowden affair, the American public and the U.S. political system have wrestled with the meaning of treason—legally, morally, and politically. The Founding Fathers themselves were considered traitors by the British Crown, and the newly formed United States struggled with how to treat Americans who sided with King George III during the Revolution. Eighty years later, many Northerners condemned Southerners as traitors for breaking with the Union. In the 20th century, loyalty to ideologies over nation-states led to the cloak-and-dagger espionage of the Cold War. And in our own complex era of digital eavesdropping and online secret-sharing, definitions of treason have become still grayer and more elusive. What does it mean to contemporary Americans to betray one’s country? Who gets to decide and pass judgment on what constitutes treason—juries, politicians, the mass media, social networks? And have traditional ideas about treason kept pace in a world where many people’s sense of their duty to country may conflict with other deeply held allegiances, identities, and ethical convictions? UCLA legal scholar Eugene Volokh, UC Davis legal scholar Carlton F.W. Larson, and Yale Law School Associate Dean and former FBI counterintelligence special agent Asha Rangappa sit down with Warren Olney at Zócalo to consider the perils, the moral quandaries, and the punishments that spring from acts—and accusations—of national betrayal.​

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Are College Campuses Rewriting the Rules of Sex in America?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/college-campuses-rewriting-rules-sex-america/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/college-campuses-rewriting-rules-sex-america/#respond Thu, 17 Aug 2017 19:00:04 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=87573 America’s college campuses have become crucial testing grounds—and, at times, battlegrounds—as the country grapples with rapidly changing modes and mores of sexual behavior and expression. Fraternities are being scrutinized for promoting a culture of alcohol-fueled male privilege and presumption. Lecture halls and quads ring out with passionate debates about how to set the ground rules for sexual consent. Academic officials are being called to act as judges and arbiters over some of the most intimate aspects of students’ lives. Millennials attending college are trying to navigate a highly sexualized environment that’s both increasingly liberated and increasingly rules-based, where legal protections are widening but certain forms of privilege and abuse remain entrenched. Vanessa Grigoriadis, contributing editor at The New York Times Magazine and author of Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus, visits Zócalo to explore how ideas about sexuality, as well as the written and unwritten rules

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America’s college campuses have become crucial testing grounds—and, at times, battlegrounds—as the country grapples with rapidly changing modes and mores of sexual behavior and expression. Fraternities are being scrutinized for promoting a culture of alcohol-fueled male privilege and presumption. Lecture halls and quads ring out with passionate debates about how to set the ground rules for sexual consent. Academic officials are being called to act as judges and arbiters over some of the most intimate aspects of students’ lives. Millennials attending college are trying to navigate a highly sexualized environment that’s both increasingly liberated and increasingly rules-based, where legal protections are widening but certain forms of privilege and abuse remain entrenched. Vanessa Grigoriadis, contributing editor at The New York Times Magazine and author of Blurred Lines: Rethinking Sex, Power, and Consent on Campus, visits Zócalo to explore how ideas about sexuality, as well as the written and unwritten rules of sexual engagement, are being redrafted at America’s institutions of higher learning.

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Are Housing Prices Destroying the California Dream?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/housing-prices-destroying-california-dream/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/housing-prices-destroying-california-dream/#respond Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:22:49 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=87556 Housing never has been more valuable than it is in today’s California—the average Golden State home is worth nearly a half-million dollars, more than two-and-a-half times the national average. Such prices reflect the enduring appeal of California as a place to live, and rising home values have helped millions of California homeowners to build the wealth they need to pay for their children’s education and their own retirement. But what are the hidden costs of this over-the-top home equity to California, its economy, and the aspirations of longtime residents as well as newcomers? What kind of pressures do soaring housing costs place on Californians—from young families struggling to buy first homes and achieve financial security, to older working people who want to retire but fear whether they can’t afford to keep living here? How much of a factor are housing prices in the decisions of Californians to live further from

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Housing never has been more valuable than it is in today’s California—the average Golden State home is worth nearly a half-million dollars, more than two-and-a-half times the national average. Such prices reflect the enduring appeal of California as a place to live, and rising home values have helped millions of California homeowners to build the wealth they need to pay for their children’s education and their own retirement. But what are the hidden costs of this over-the-top home equity to California, its economy, and the aspirations of longtime residents as well as newcomers? What kind of pressures do soaring housing costs place on Californians—from young families struggling to buy first homes and achieve financial security, to older working people who want to retire but fear whether they can’t afford to keep living here? How much of a factor are housing prices in the decisions of Californians to live further from their jobs or depart the state entirely? California Senate President pro Tem Kevin de León, AARP ​housing policy expert ​Rodney ​Harrell, executive director of Housing California Lisa Hershey, and dean of the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs Gary Segura visit Zócalo to examine how our state’s housing market boom both enables and endangers the California dream of independence, the good life, and having a home of one’s own.

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Is the Republican Party Dead?http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/republican-party-dead/ http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/event/republican-party-dead/#respond Thu, 13 Jul 2017 19:53:33 +0000 zocalo http://www.zocalopublicsquare.org/?post_type=event&p=86779 The Republican Party should be the dominant force in American politics. GOP politicians now control the White House, 33 governorships, and hold majorities in the U.S. House, Senate, and 32 state legislatures. But in spite of its electoral success, the rise of Donald Trump has raised difficult questions about the party’s long-term future. Does Trump’s flirtation with white nationalism threaten to taint the party of Lincoln and permanently alienate younger and more diverse generations of Americans? Can the GOP survive the rise of anti-establishment forces on the right that reject old-guard conservatives who remain its financial base? Is unity even possible for a GOP trying to navigate vast regional and ideological differences among its members, or is the party destined to split? Sacramento GOP political consultant and partner at GrassrootsLab Mike Madrid, public affairs strategist and founder of 3.14 Communications Cassandra Pye, and Ballotpedia publisher Leslie Graves visit Zócalo to

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The Republican Party should be the dominant force in American politics. GOP politicians now control the White House, 33 governorships, and hold majorities in the U.S. House, Senate, and 32 state legislatures. But in spite of its electoral success, the rise of Donald Trump has raised difficult questions about the party’s long-term future. Does Trump’s flirtation with white nationalism threaten to taint the party of Lincoln and permanently alienate younger and more diverse generations of Americans? Can the GOP survive the rise of anti-establishment forces on the right that reject old-guard conservatives who remain its financial base? Is unity even possible for a GOP trying to navigate vast regional and ideological differences among its members, or is the party destined to split? Sacramento GOP political consultant and partner at GrassrootsLab Mike Madrid, public affairs strategist and founder of 3.14 Communications Cassandra Pye, and Ballotpedia publisher Leslie Graves visit Zócalo to consider whether the Republican Party is stronger or weaker than it looks.

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