Los Angeles

What Will Trump’s Trade Wars Do to the U.S. Economy?

Photo courtesy of Pixabay.

A Zócalo/UCLA Anderson Event
Moderated by Natalie Kitroeff, Economy Reporter, The New York Times
LOCATION:
National Center for the Preservation of Democracy
111 N. Central Ave
Los Angeles, CA 90012
Paid parking is available at the Little Tokyo Mall Public Parking Lot (318 E. First St.) Enter from San Pedro Street. Additional paid parking is available at the Japanese Village Plaza Parking Lot (356 E First St.) and the Office Depot Plaza Parking Lot (401 Alameda St.).

The United States is moving towards more protectionist policies—abandoning a system of free trade that America itself had built. Nationalists in the White House and labor unions are embracing tariffs to protect older industries, like steel and aluminum, while some economists encourage trade protections for America’s intellectual property and new technologies like artificial intelligence. What does greater protectionism look like in 21st century America? Are there advantages to raising tariffs? And in what ways will American businesses, workers, and consumers feel the consequences of protectionism and resulting trade wars? UCLA Anderson economist Ed Leamer, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Trade and Compliance in the Obama administration Michael Camuñez, Director of the University of California Agricultural Issues Center Daniel Sumner, and David Loevinger, former U.S. Treasury Department senior coordinator for China affairs, visit Zócalo to discuss how a newly protectionist America will affect Americans.

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