Los Angeles

Do Americans Misunderstand the Roots of Crime?

Fox Butterfield

Photo courtesy of Paul Rich Studio.

LOCATION:
National Center for the Preservation of Democracy
111 N. Central Ave.
Los Angeles , CA 90012
Paid parking is available at the Little Tokyo Mall Public Parking Lot (318 E. First St.). Enter from San Pedro Street. Additional paid parking is available at the Japanese Village Plaza Parking Lot (356 E. First St.) and the Office Depot Plaza Parking Lot (401 Alameda St.).
A Zócalo/KCRW “Critical Thinking with Warren Olney” Event
Moderated by Warren Olney, Host, KCRW’s “To the Point”

Americans treat crime as a public scourge. And we attack it via public systems—our prisons, probation departments, and school and youth programs—to intervene before people go wrong. But what if crime isn’t just a public problem, but also an intensely private issue tied to families? Just five percent of American families account for half of all crimes, and 10 percent of families account for two-thirds. And new research suggests crime is a family tradition passed on through multiple generations, even to great-grandchildren. Why does crime run in families? How can we help, treat, or punish families to break their cycles of crime? And what should this reality of crime mean for efforts to reform incarceration and law enforcement in the United States, home to one-quarter of the world’s prison population? Former New York Times national correspondent Fox Butterfield, author of In My Father’s House: A New View of How Crime Runs in the Family, sits down with Warren Olney at Zócalo to explain how crime really works and to explore the best ways to fight it.

More Upcoming Events

What Can Hawai’i Teach the World About Climate Change?

The Aloha State is on the front lines of climate change. The seas surrounding Hawai‘i have already risen as much as 3.5 inches since 1960. Long-term forecasts anticipate massive beach erosion, higher average temperatures, prolonged droughts, heavy flooding linked to volatile trade winds, and increased ocean acidity that could bleach coral and disrupt marine migration. But Hawai‘i is also on …

Is Nature Only for White People?

In the United States, a large country defined by its greatest natural wonders, engaging with nature is considered essential to good health and civic virtue. But African Americans, while representing 13 percent of the U.S. population, make up just 7 percent of visitors to our national parks; Latinos and Native Americans are similarly underrepresented among park attendees. The leaders and …

Can U.S. Democracy Survive Russian Information Warfare?

American intelligence services have unanimously concluded that the Russian government intervened in the 2016 U.S. elections, and seeks to meddle again this fall. One of Russia’s methods was to use social media to distribute disinformation. What’s the big-picture strategy behind this style of attack, and how badly is it damaging our society and politics? Does disinformation have lasting effects on …

What Can Termites Teach Us About the Future of Technology?

Parents dress their children in bee costumes, and the ant has its own Hollywood movie franchise. But the lowly termite has long been best known for causing billions in annual property damages. That might now be changing. Around the world, as scientists try to figure out biology’s underlying rules and harness them to solve problems, they are looking to …

Did Women Ever Rule the World?

Women might have more control over their own destinies today than at any previous time in history. But in the great game of geopolitics, contemporary women rulers hold little sway. Even Angela Merkel, often referred to as the world’s most powerful woman, is merely the head of a weak coalition government in Germany, home to just one percent of the …