The Jewish Immigrant Philanthropist Who Didn’t Like the Word “Charity”

Julius Rosenwald Made Sears a Retail Giant and Used His Wealth to Give the Poor Tools for Upward Mobility

The biography of Julius Rosenwald, one of the most thoughtful and transformative philanthropists in American history, parallels the life experiences of many Jewish immigrant families of the mid-19th century—women and men who left German-speaking lands, relied heavily on family and community networks, and arrived in America with commercial skills that served them well.

Enjoying the benefits of whiteness, they arrived just in time for the physical expansion of the United States across the continent, referred to by patriotic orators as “Manifest Destiny.” Americans who moved west desired consumer goods to …

More In: charity

We Are the World. We Are the Charity Single.

After the Orlando Shooting, the Musical Staple of 1980s Philanthropy Makes a Comeback

A few years ago I took on a research challenge: to listen to every charity single released in the United Kingdom between December 1984 and the end of 1995. I …

Homeless Services Don’t End Homelessness

Good Intentions Notwithstanding, Soup Kitchens and Shelters Have Become an Industry Unto Themselves

Homelessness is often described as a problem we must solve—and Los Angeles city and county now have expensive plans to do so. Homelessness is also an industry.

And as George …

Cruising East L.A. Before Dawn

I Get on My Bike While the City Sleeps to Deliver Food to the Homeless

by Aurelio Jose Barrera

Every morning I wake up before 5 a.m. and head out from my house to walk for an hour. But one or two days a week, I …

Is Philanthropy Too Powerful?

(We’re Not Talking About You, Of Course)

 

Philanthropy has a good name, but it doesn’t always make friends. Every foundation has its own mission, and these missions can be in conflict with one another. They can also, …