Excavating the Future City

Through His Camera, Naoya Hatakeyama Reimagines and Rebuilds Our Human Environment

Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama, who was born in Japan in 1958, has spent decades exploring and documenting the human-made environment, with a particular emphasis on cities. He has explored everywhere from a limestone quarry overrun by colonies of bats, to the rebuilding of Hatakeyama’s hometown, Rikuzentakata, which was pulverized by a massive earthquake and devastating tsunami in 2011. What the artist seeks to capture in his startling images are the intertwined, endless processes of birth, death, and rebirth. And through this, he envisions the future of our built environment.

A comprehensive …

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