How the EU’s Greek Tragedy Became a British Farce

Out-of-Touch Elites Have Themselves to Blame for Losing Voters to "Populism"

British citizens took to the polls to cast their “Leave” ballots—and their grievances—in the now-infamous Brexit vote last June, seeking to escape the overarching power of the European Union. Their triumph stunned British and global elites, but shouldn’t have; the odds were stacked in the Leave camp’s favor.

The groundwork for the Brexit debacle was laid the previous summer when Europe crushed the progressive pro-European SYRIZA government elected in Greece in January 2015. Most Britons were not directly engaged with the Greek trauma. Many surely looked askance at the Greek …

More In: Greece

Ancient Greek Demagogues Might Sound Familiar in 2016

At “How Does Democracy Survive Demagoguery?”, a Zócalo/Getty Villa “Open Art” event at the Getty Villa in Malibu, Eric Robinson, an Indiana University historian of ancient Greece and Rome, describes …

Almost Any Politician in a Democracy Is a Bit of a Demagogue

A Classicist, a Historian, and a Rhetorician Talk Trump, Clinton, and Cleon

There’s plenty of nastiness in our democracy. But is there anything new?

For all the fear and consternation about the lies, insults, conspiracy theories, and rhetorical excesses of the 2016 presidential …

Don’t Blame Germany for Greece’s Debt Crisis

No Country Has Done More to Democratize and Raise Europe's Living Standards

Germany knows a thing or two about being punished for bad deeds, but in recent weeks the country has been the poster child for the old adage that no good …

Why Greece’s ‘Suicidal’ Referendum Is Still a Good Idea

While It Won’t Save the Economy, a Vote at Least May Prevent Social and Political Upheaval

After months of difficult negotiations, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has called for a public vote Sunday on whether or not Greece should accept the austerity measures that its creditors …

Euro Woes

Forget about the German-Greek Showdown; Root for the Brits

Germany meets Greece in soccer’s European Championship on Friday, and–given the crisis that ties together their two star-crossed economies–life once more will become the metaphor for sports, and sports for …