Why Oscar Wilde’s Life Was a Work of Art

More Than a Century After His Death, a Paris Exhibition Illuminates Both the Tawdry and the Transcendent

The French have always loved Oscar Wilde, just as he always loved them. Long before Britain sent him to jail for enjoying sex with other males in 1895, he made Paris his spiritual home. He wrote the erotic tragedy Salomé (1892) in French, but the Examiner of Plays in London banned it after deeming it “half Biblical, half pornographic.” Much later, when he left prison in May 1897, he had to escape London, since his reputation there was ruined. So he crossed the Channel to Paris, where he resided, …

Could I Stop Being Gay?

My Parents and I Desperately Wanted to Change My Sexual Orientation. But Therapy Only Made Me Hate Myself.

Would I truly go to heaven, despite being gay?

This question haunted me growing up. My earliest and most influential childhood memory is being 4 years old and “accepting Jesus into …

Gay—and Returning to Mass

How a Funeral, a Pope, and the Passage of Time Brought Me Back to a Tender, More Forgiving Church

I set foot in a Catholic church today for the first time in decades. I am one of those lapsed Catholics you’ve heard about. There are millions of us around …

When My Dad Came Out

I Dealt With It Badly. So Did He.

“Are you gay?” my 12-year-old self asked, as if asking about the weather.

We had stopped in the deli section of a supermarket near my father’s home in metro Detroit to …

Has Obama Given Up On One America?

A Federalist Approach To Gay Marriage May Be Fashionable. It’s Also Sad.

The main news event of today has clearly been the Supreme Court’s forceful Equal Protection decision in the DOMA case. Many view it as a prelude to a future decision declaring a …