Night Blind

One night, driving along Blue River Road, I’m startled and disoriented by the shock of headlights coming up over a hill. When you’re night blind like me, the vision blurs, and in that moment before clarity returns, you see only edges of images—here, a road sign; there, a sycamore—and feel suspended, not quite yourself, not quite alone.

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