The Myth of Untouched Wilderness That Gave Rise to Modern Miami

Indians, Slaves, and Spanish Missionaries Settled the Area, but Marketers and Entrepreneurs Erased Their Legacy

Miami is widely known as the “Magic City.” It earned its nickname in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, shortly after the arrival of Henry Flagler’s East Coast Railroad and the opening of his opulent Royal Palm Hotel in 1897. Visitors from across the country were lured to this extravagant five-story hotel, at the edge of the nation’s southernmost frontier. From their vantage point, South Florida was the Wild West—and Miami could only exist if incoming settlers were able to tame it. And tame it they did. Miami’s population …

More In: Miami

Economist Robert Cruz

A Fan of Cool Days and Caring Strangers

Robert Cruz is the chief economist of Miami-Dade county; previously, he spent 25 years in academia teaching at Barry and Florida-International Universities. Before participating in a panel on South Florida …

Haitian Women of Miami’s Marleine Bastien

I Want to Wake Up With My Heart Singing

Marleine Bastien is the founder and executive director of Fanm Ayisyen Nam Miyami/Haitian Women of Miami. Before participating in a panel on what immigration reform might mean for Miami, she …

Should Florida Love Immigration Reform?

A Panel Assesses What the Proposed Legislation In Congress Would Mean For Miami

A higher percentage of immigrants live, work, and own businesses in Miami than in any other city in America. But as comfortable as South Florida has become with absorbing people …

Weirdest of Wonderlands

Images of South Florida By Photographer Chad Ress

They call it the “Magic City” and the “Dream City.” The essayist and critic John Leonard found it to be a perfect cinematic backdrop, “a surreal sandwiching of abstract art …