Eduardo Porter and Cynthia Greenlee | Zócalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

How Has Racism Shaped the American Economy?

What is the relationship between American economics and American racism, and can it be severed? How will systemic racism, past and present, slow our emergence from the current downturn? New York Times journalist Eduardo Porter, author of the new book American Poison: How Racial Hostility Destroyed Our Promise, visits Zócalo with historian and writer Cynthia Greenlee to explore economic disparities …

How Can Humans Coexist with Monster Wildfires? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

How Can Humans Coexist With Monster Wildfires?

From Australia to the Amazon to the American West, megafires—wildfires that burn more than 100,000 acres of land—have grown so frequent, large, and deadly that they’ve forced a reevaluation of how human societies coexist with fire. In a warming world, governments are confronting whether we must retreat from certain places to survive in a fierier world. Have fires become too …

Live on Twitter: Will Anyone Ever Be Able to Afford to Live in California? with Jerry Nickelsburg and Erika Aguilar | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

Will Anyone Ever Be Able to Afford to Live in California?

On Wednesday, June 24, the latest UCLA Anderson Forecast predicted a difficult economic future for California and reported that the U.S. economy is in a “Depression-like crisis.” What does this mean for California’s pressing long-term problems, especially housing? Could this depression offer opportunities to make housing more affordable in an expensive state?  Jerry Nickelsburg, economist and director of the UCLA …

Can We Build A Better Summer Olympics? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

Can We Build A Better Summer Olympics?

The Summer Olympics are the one time every four years when millions of people tune into track and field and swimming; stars from rival basketball and soccer clubs come together to represent their respective countries; and people learn (and then forget) the rules of synchronized swimming and the difference between platform and springboard diving. But the Olympics are also fraught …

Zócalo Live on Twitter: Four Questions with Jennifer Mercieca and William Sturkey | Zócalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

Zócalo Live on Twitter: Four Questions with Jennifer Mercieca and William Sturkey

What is the history behind the president’s style of rhetoric, and what does the past tell us about how to counteract it? Jennifer Mercieca, historian of rhetoric and author of Demagogue for President, visits Zócalo with William Sturkey, historian and author of Hattiesburg: An American City in Black and White. Live on Twitter, they trade questions and insights into the …

How Do Oppressed People Build Community? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

How Do Oppressed People Build Community?

Throughout the first half of the 20th century, Hattiesburg, Mississippi, was a city of opportunity for African Americans. Leaving the surrounding cotton fields behind, they built churches, schools, clubs, and businesses; they were tied together by Friday night football games, dance halls, a newspaper, and charitable organizations. At the same time, Hattiesburg, like the rest of the South, was a …