Do Successful Secession Movements Have to Be Democratic?

At the End of the Day, Splitting Up Your Country Requires Everyone to Agree on the Rules

How should countries split themselves up?

Democratically, of course. But saying that is only a start to answering a complicated and difficult question.

And it’s an urgent question, because recently there has been an increase in the number of movements for national self-determination and secession. Worldwide, between 1994-2017, I found 55 referendums registered, from Catalonia to Scotland, New Zealand to the Falklands, from Quebec to Iraqi Kurdistan. Most involved not full independence but rather a change in the political status of a state, or a separation or an integration of territory within …

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One Out of Eleven Chinese Uyghurs Is in a Concentration Camp

The Communist Party's Need for Total Control Has Grown Worse Since Xi Jinping Came to Power in 2012

To get arrested today in Western China, you don’t have to do much more than buy a SIM card for a relative. You could easily find yourself detained for having …

Why Taxpayers Should Pay for Local News

Neither Wealthy Companies nor Philanthropists Have Communities’ Interests at Heart

Whose job it is to revive local journalism in California?

Our state’s elites have a clear, if dubious, answer to that question: themselves.

These days, wealthy people and companies consider restoring …

The 19th Century Labor Movement That Brought Black and White Arkansans Together

In 1888, Small Farmers, Sharecroppers, and Industrial Workers Organized to Fight Inequality

Today, when Americans think about the tradition of political protest to protect democracy, they often recall the mid-20th century, when millions of Americans participated in the civil rights movement and …