Washington

Is Depression a 21st-Century Epidemic?

Is Depression a 21st Century Epidemic?

Photo courtesy of Transformer18 via Flickr.

A Zócalo/UCLA Event
Moderated by Amy Ellis Nutt, Former Science Writer, The Washington Post
LOCATION:
House of Sweden, Alfred Nobel Hall
2900 K Street NW
Washington, DC 20007
Parking information is available here.

More than 17 million adults in America—7 percent of people 18 and older in the U.S.—have at least one major depressive episode annually. An estimated 15 percent of all people on Earth are expected to experience depression during their lifetimes. In 2015, UCLA launched a campus-wide initiative to cut the global burden of depression in half by 2050. Are we suffering more from depression than we used to? What is the balance between genetics and life experience in determining who suffers from this disease? How have the excesses, technologies, and even toxins of 21st-century life contributed to this epidemic? And what 21st-century tools might end it? UCLA Center for Neurobehavioral Genetics director and psychiatrist Nelson Freimer and psychologist and director of UCLA’s Anxiety and Depression Research Center Michelle Craske visit Zócalo to discuss modernity’s role in the global epidemic of depression.

More Upcoming Events

What Can Everyday Angelenos Do About Homelessness? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian
Los Angeles

What Can Everyday Angelenos Do About Homelessness?

Los Angeles leaders have developed billion-dollar plans to boost services and build housing for the homeless. But such plans are now stuck in political quicksand, with neighborhood activists blocking shelters and new housing. Meanwhile, living in a city with a homelessness emergency is an everyday struggle, and there is no guidebook to dealing with sidewalk squalor or witnessing human suffering …

Is Politics Really Tearing America Apart? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian
Los Angeles

Is Politics Really Tearing America Apart?

In late 2018, the Associated Press concluded, “Americans are more divided than ever, gridlocked over social issues, race, gender and the economy.” And Americans tell pollsters they feel more divided, and worried about greater social conflict in the future. But many scholars argue that Americans were far more divided in earlier times, and indicators of broader social conflict—like crime and …

Does Hawai‘i Welcome Immigrants? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian
Honolulu

Does Hawai‘i Welcome Immigrants?

The history of modern Hawai‘i has been defined by immigration, from the Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, and Puerto Ricans imported to work on 19th-century plantations, to the Filipino, Korean, and Micronesian migrants who make possible today’s growing tourism and hospitality industry. Arrivals from around the world have shaped and reshaped the islands’ economy and culture, and made Hawai‘i a global crossroads. …

How Are Immigrants Changing the Way Health Care Is Practiced? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian
Los Angeles

How Are Immigrants Changing the Way Health Care Is Practiced?

No sector in the state of California relies more on immigrants than health care. One-quarter of the health workforce—from nurses to pharmacists to home health aides—and nearly one-third of all doctors and surgeons are foreign-born. And, according to some studies, patients of foreign-trained health providers actually do better than patients who rely on native-born Americans. How have immigrants working in …

Did Americans Ever Get Along? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian
Salinas

Did Americans Ever Get Along?

“From the first we have treated our minorities abominably, the way the old boys do the new kids in school,” Steinbeck wrote in “E Pluribus Unum,” an essay in America and the Americans. American identity, the author argued, was forged through this cruel process of hazing the newest, and that once any ethnic group became established, it would pick on …