The Last Outlaw Art Form?

Everything from spray-paint scrawled initials to monumental publicly-funded murals might be called street art, but most of the pieces in Trespass: A History of Uncommisioned Urban Art fall somewhere in between – unsanctioned but appreciated, sometimes quite widely, and even tacitly allowed. Still, the works benefit from being made and seen in places where they shouldn’t be – as famed street artist Banksy puts it in his brief introduction, “…beyond the ‘No Entry’ sign everything happens in higher definition.” The over 300 works – compiled and contextualized by Paper magazine …

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Lawrence Bender

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A Writer’s Life, Defined and Ended by War

The Life of Irene Nemirovsky: 1903-1942
by Olivier Philipponat and Patrick Lienhardt

Reviewed by Shahnaz Habib

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Charles Bukowski Finds Home

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