A Letter From Santiago, Where Chileans Are Seeking a New Constitution

Hopes Are High for Transforming the Country's Democracy, but the Risks May Be Even Higher

Chile is raising hopes and winning praise worldwide as it elects delegates to a new convention with the goal of replacing the current constitution, a 1980 product of Augusto Pinochet’s dictatorship. But from here in Santiago, where I live and work as a political scientist, the path to a new, and more democratic governing document looks full of dangers, some of them posed by democracy itself.

The high expectations surrounding Chile, population 19 million, now reflect just how distinct its history and present are. It was the first country in the …

Loyola Marymount Political Scientist Fernando Guerra

If You Have the Chance to Shine Your Shoes, Go Ahead and Do It

Political scientist Fernando Guerra directs the Thomas and Dorothy Leavey Center for the Study of Los Angeles at Loyola Marymount University. Before participating in a panel about why Angelenos won’t …

UCLA Public Affairs Dean Franklin D. Gilliam, Jr.

He Dreams of Meeting Prince … and Eating Risotto for Breakfast

Franklin D. Gilliam, Jr. is dean of the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs; his research focuses on strategic communications, public policy, electoral politics, and racial and ethnic politics. Before …

What My Teacher James Q. Wilson Missed

His Achievements Were Huge-But So Were His Blind Spots

Around 1962, I took James Q. Wilson’s undergraduate course on urban politics and learned a lot about cities, classes, political machines, and reformers. He was an untenured professor just starting …