Vintage Steampunk Goddesses

Ramona Szczerba creates densely detailed illustrations of “things that never happened to people who never were in places that do not exist but perhaps should have.” Created from hand-cut vintage images, etchings, and bits of ephemera—many found in a cache of memorabilia from her own family—her work has evolved from the steampunk aesthetic into an alternate reality of its own, where legendary women and dark fairies frolic with unlikely inventors and woodland creatures. Her vignettes invite us to imagine a rich backstory. Make sure to look closely to get a glimpse of …

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The Postcards That Captured America’s Love for the Open Road

From Mid-Century Until Today, “Greetings From” Postcards Have Combined a ‘Fantastical View’ of the Country With Car Culture Obsession

The most prolific producer of the iconic 20th-century American travel postcard was a German-born printer, a man named Curt Teich, who immigrated to America in 1895. In 1931, Teich’s printing …

Are You Cursed If You Steal Rocks From the Petrified Forest?

A Photographer Ponders Beauty, Truth, and the Guilt of Visitors Who Pilfer Souvenirs From the Arizona National Park

In 2011, I was traveling in Arizona photographing meteorites and the misidentified meteorites known as “meteor-wrongs.” My work with the meteor-wrongs went quicker than expected and my wife and I …

Art of the American Kitchen

Anisa Makhoul trained as a printmaker at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and turned to illustration after living in Amsterdam, where she bought her first set of gouache paints. …

Excavating the Future City

Through His Camera, Naoya Hatakeyama Reimagines and Rebuilds Our Human Environment

Japanese photographer Naoya Hatakeyama, who was born in Japan in 1958, has spent decades exploring and documenting the human-made environment, with a particular emphasis on cities. He has explored everywhere …

Why Do So Many Public Buildings in the U.S. Look Like Greek Temples?

In the Architectural Void of a New Nation, William Strickland Borrowed from Ancient Athens to Express America's Democratic Ethos

President Andrew Jackson took a keen interest in the construction of the federal mint in Philadelphia, a grand, columned edifice, inspired by the temples of ancient Greece, that opened in 1833. Jackson was not a man …