When Numeracy Superseded Literacy—and Created the Modern World

The Renaissance's Embrace of Numbers Revolutionized Commerce, Science, and Art

In 1025, two learned monks, Radolph of Liége and Ragimbold of Cologne, exchanged several letters on mathematical topics they had encountered while reading a manuscript of the sixth-century Roman philosopher, Boethius, whose writings supplied one of the few mathematics sources in the Middle Ages. These monks were not mathematicians, but they were inquisitive and keen to further their learning. They pondered Boethius’ words. They struggled. In particular, they puzzled over the theorem that the interior angles of a triangle were equal to two right angles. “Interior angles” of a triangle? …

More In: information

Why Artificial Intelligence Won’t Replace CEOs

An MBA’s Instinct Is Increasingly Vital in the Age of Information Overload

Peter Drucker was prescient about most things, but the computer wasn’t one of them. “The computer … is a moron,” the management guru asserted in a McKinsey Quarterly article in …

If You Think Libraries Are Redundant, Read This

More Than Strict Rules And Dusty Stacks, Libraries Build Community

Twenty-first century librarians do not wear their hair in buns. They don’t relish levying fines on forgetful patrons. They won’t scold you for bringing a cup of coffee into the …

You Think No One Sees You Tinkering With Your Wikipedia Entry, Mr. Congressman?

I’m a Wikipedian. I Monitor, Write, and Edit Those Articles You Rely On. Shouldn’t You Know a Little More About What I Do and How I Do It?

Let me tell you a story about Ron. Well, his name isn’t Ron. But everything else in this story is true.

Ron and I arrived at a social function. Ron assigned …