When Baltimore Medical Students Were Free to Rob the City’s Graves

In 19th-Century Maryland, Stealing Corpses Wasn't a Crime. And a Half-Dozen Medical Schools Needed Cadavers.

Railroads changed everything. The formation in 1828 of the nation’s first common carrier, the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, revolutionized transportation, altered people’s sense of time and place, and knitted America together into a nation.

Among the many unforeseen consequences of this transformation was this peculiar note: Body snatchers digging up graves could quickly ship corpses to medical schools needing dissection material. The story of how grave robbing flourished in Baltimore for more than 70 years reveals both the dysfunctional underside of medicine in a place that liked to call itself the …

Baltimore Is Still Troubled, Still Racist—and Still My City

Absolutely Anything Is Possible in Crabtown, Which Is Why I'm Keeping the Faith as It Burns Around Me

When things turned very ugly in Baltimore on Monday—widespread looting, massive property destruction, arson, and assaults on police, motorists and pedestrians—I called a friend to see if she was okay.

Riots …

Tinseltown Cab Fare

A Girl from Baltimore’s Trip to L.A., and Back

“I hate drunks, they are so obnoxious. I should know, I used to be one …” –Mary Carol Reilly on the fundamentals of being a cabbie

She used to lie in …

The Pitcher and the Poet

Coping with Loss in Baltimore

I never had the chance to meet Mike Flanagan, the former Baltimore Oriole pitcher and baseball executive who took his own life over the summer.

But if given the chance, I …

Greece, You’re Embarrassing Us

The Laments and Mopings of Baltimore's Greektown

It was nervous laughter, the kind you might get when making fun of your mother without knowing she’s in the room. The kind that often leads to trouble.

The jokester was …