Why Your Bank Wants No Part of Your Business

Post-Recession Banking Reforms Are Throttling Small Independent Companies

Capital is cheap almost everywhere except for in the heart of the American economy—independent U.S. companies with less than $100 million in revenues.

This is the downside of regulations, enacted after the Great Recession, that made banks safer than ever. Unfortunately, those same regulations also caused banks to focus on mortgages and publicly traded loans, rather than lending to growing private companies. This dislocation may explain why the economic recovery since 2007 has been the most tepid in the past 50 years.

Middle market companies in the U.S., defined as companies …

My Transnational Son Has a Passport to Optimism

As Europeans Agonize Over Birth Rates and Migrants, Bicultural Kids Like Mine Will Dispel the Continent’s Paranoia

A couple of weeks ago, my 3-year-old son, Max, agreed to let me take him to school by bicycle. This was momentous because recently he’s been insisting that we are …

Parsimony, Be Gone

Political Economist Mark Blyth Says Austerity Is Not Our Friend

Austerity never works. This was the argument of Brown University political economist Mark Blyth, author of Austerity: The History of a Dangerous Idea, as he offered his perspective on economic …

Sorry, Our Banks Are Still Broken

Anat Admati Diagnoses Our Rickety Financial Institutions and How To Tame Them

In the wake of our most recent financial crisis, Stanford University economist Anat Admati, coauthor of The Bankers’ New Clothes: What’s Wrong with Banking and What to Do About It, …

Was that an FDR-Sized Stimulus?

Obama’s $800 Billion Bill Was Big, But It May Not Have Been a New Deal

Few people know that the federal stimulus legislation of 2009, officially known as the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, was twice as big as the Louisiana Purchase and Marshall Plan …

My Hard Times in Tampa

The Sunsets Are Still Free, But Economic Change Has High Costs

 

We hear so much about presidential candidates–and so little about life in the states that elect them. In “Beyond the Circus,” writers take us off the trail and give us …