• The Takeaway

    Hello Blockchain, Bye-Bye Resumes

    Could Digital Learning and Employment Records (LERs) Create a Fairer Hiring Process?

    by Jackie Mansky

    The resume has been around for hundreds of years, and is one of the most vital parts of the hiring process for ...

  • Poetry

    by Martha Silano

    but so what. In the sultry nights of August, I’ll unravel –
    wanna join me? We can pant ourselves pantless ...

  • Essay

    Lebanon's Other Explosion

    When Disasters Become the Norm, People Stop Paying Attention—But I'm Still Telling This Country's Stories

    by Abby Sewell

    It was the explosion that drove home to me how irrevocably Lebanon was broken ...

  • Sketchbook

    Diana Steinsnyder is a textile designer and creative director based in Southern California. She has designed for a variety of fashion and beauty brands ...

Essay

Where I Go: Lithuania's Vanished Center of Jewish Life

In Vilna, Where Thousands Were Murdered, I Learned How Difficult It Is to Mourn an Absence

By David Nasaw

I did it all backward. Instead of taking my research trips before writing my book, like any normal historian would have, I’d waited. Only after I had completed my first draft did I finally make my way to Vilna (now Vilnius), the capital of Lithuania during its brief moment of independence in the interwar period.
  In June 1941, when German troops overran the country, Vilna was home to 55,000 Jewish residents and 12,000–15,000 refugees from German-occupied Poland. Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, the spiritual and academic center of Holocaust ...

Essay

What Does the U.S. Owe Climate Refugees?

Central Americans Are Fleeing an Ecological Disaster They Didn't Cause

by Michael B. Smith

Last fall, back-to-back major hurricanes, Eta and Iota, slammed into the Caribbean coast of Central America, creating storm surges and flooding from Belize to Panama. In parts of Honduras and Guatemala more rain fell in two weeks than typically falls in four months. Mudslides such as the one that buried the Maya community of Nuevo Quejá in Guatemala killed scores of people and rendered the landscape uninhabitable. The damage was estimated at more than $9 billion. Physical recovery will take decades, if it happens at all.
  One survivor of the destruction living along …

  • by Allison Adelle Hedge Coke

    This rock house loft can’t ...

  • by Laynie Browne

    From shine, lux, light, sleep with ...

  • by Travis Chi Wing Lau

    Lotuses unfolding ...

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