California’s Immigrants Are Making Health Care More Wholistic and Human California’s Immigrants Are Making Health Care More Wholistic and Human

‘We Put the Ultrasound Machine in the Local Pharmacy’ | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

We Put the Ultrasound Machine in the Local Pharmacy

Physician Assistant Luz Garcia Is Bringing a Family Practice to Where Her Community Is

If you walk into the local pharmacy in downtown Gonzales and turn to the right, you’ll see an examination room with an ultrasound machine. It represents more than just a cheaper alternative to an ultrasound at a hospital or other facilities in the Salinas Valley. It’s an example of the health care system I think we should build—one that meets our patients’ and their families’ medical needs first, treating them at the most accessible times and most convenient places for them, and at an affordable cost, regardless of whether they are insured, uninsured, or underinsured. …

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Seeing Patients as More Than a Collection of Body Parts | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

Seeing Patients as More Than a Collection of Body Parts

Psychiatrist Ijeoma Ijeaku Trains Medical Residents to Heal Wholistically

How can we improve the quality of psychiatric care that Americans receive?
  I address this daily as a psychiatrist in my primary job at a children’s clinic in San Jacinto that is part of the Riverside University Health System. And I address this more generally by training medical students, residents, and fellows through my position on the clinical faculty in psychiatry and neuroscience at UC Riverside School of Medicine.
  I believe that immigrant physicians, nurses, and other health care providers are starting to redefine the way medicine is practiced, simply because so many immigrants have found work in the American health care industry. …

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Why Are There So Many Filipino Nurses in California? | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

Why Are There So Many Filipino Nurses in California?

After Filling a Nursing Shortage in the 1960s, Immigrant Caregivers Have Changed the Practice and the Politics of Health Care

In California hospitals today, immigration has diversified not only the state’s patient population, but the demographics of its caregivers as well.

  It is now commonplace to be cared for at the bedside by a Filipino immigrant nurse. According to the 2016 Survey of California Registered Nurses, Filipinos make up the second largest group of the state’s active RN workforce, nearly 18 percent. Among younger nurses, they’re even more predominant, with Filipino nurses representing nearly a quarter of nurses between ages 35 to 44 years and more than one-fifth of RNs 45 to 54 years old. …

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‘I Help My Patients Hear Themselves, Which Starts the Healing Process’ | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

‘I Help My Patients Hear Themselves, Which Starts the Healing Process’

After an Ayurvedic Doctor Solved His Digestive Problems, Ashok Jethanandani Returned to India to Become a Practitioner Himself

How can we help Californians manage chronic conditions and live better lives?
  As an immigrant and a doctor of ayurvedic medicine, this has become my calling, but I came to it late in life, through a personal illness, and a chance encounter with a doctor. …

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How California’s Immigrants Are Bringing Innovation—and Heart—to Health Care | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

How California’s Immigrants Are Bringing Innovation—and Heart—to Health Care

From Biotech to Behavioral Apps, Newcomers Are Reimagining How We Heal Our Bodies

Immigrants are already essential to healthcare in California. But they will become even more important in the future.
  Today’s health system is a giant mess—timely care is hard to find, drugs and treatments are ruinously expensive, and lethal mistakes are all too common. But things would be even worse without the immigrants who serve as doctors, nurses, and aides, often in places and in roles for which our clinics and hospitals can find no one else. In America, one in six medical professionals, and nearly one-third of physicians, are foreign-born; the numbers are slightly higher in California.
  While many of these immigrant providers represent a stopgap for now, they also hold the promise of a brighter future. Immigrants bring not just their labor but also ideas that can help us imagine how to change our health system. …

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‘When the Baby Has Colic I Talk With the Grandmother’ | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

‘When the Baby Has Colic I Talk With the Grandmother’

As a Mexico-Trained Doctor in San Diego, Brenda Green Gets the Whole Family Involved

I practice family medicine at a clinic just a few miles away from the Tijuana medical school where I earned my medical degree. But the journey from medical school to practice was long—not least because the U.S.-Mexico border stood in the way.
  My experience—I was trained in Mexico and now practice over the border in Chula Vista, in San Diego County—has taught me about just how vital immigrants are to California’s health care. It’s also shown me that immigrant physicians, like me, can play special roles in medical training and provide services and new perspectives in places where doctors are needed most. …

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Tackling Childhood Diabetes With Conversations and Lab Work | Zocalo Public Square • Arizona State University • Smithsonian

Tackling Childhood Diabetes With Conversations and Lab Work

Rohit Kohli’s Global Childhood, and Indian Medical Training, Taught Him How to Communicate—and Do a Lot With a Little

How can we wean children off sugar?
  Answering that question is the focus of my research and practice at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, where I’m chief of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition. Here in Southern California, we face a silent tsunami of obesity, diabetes, liver disease, and more, afflicting the health of our community.
  The prevalence of sugar-driven diseases has had an especially devastating impact on children of Latin American heritage who have immigrated to the U.S. during the last few decades when fast food options that are relatively inexpensive but calorie-dense have been more readily available. …

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